Feedback

Architects memo no. 41: October 1984
graffiti problems - clones are people two!


From the original terse messages scratched on the walls of the urinal in Taihape to the dynamic outpourings on the walls of the Wellington bus terminal, the 'art' of graffiti grows more intrusive every day. Whatever one's reaction to it is, and some of it can be very witty, it can not be denied that it defaces buildings and results in spiraling removal costs.

The two major factors to be considered in graffiti damage are the kind of vehicle used for the graffiti and the type of surface to which it is applied. Modern technology has supplied the graffiti artist with a formidable array of raw materials with which to pursue his/her craft; in the vanguard of which is the versatile spray bomb. Based on high polymer technology and durable pigments these materials are not easily shifted.

It is stating the obvious when saying that the smoother the surface the more easily cleaned it is, but it should be borne in mind in the war against graffiti. Unsealed porous surfaces such as brick, concrete and concrete masonry, unpolished stone etc can accept the graffiti medium within the pores of the surface and even complete removal of the graffiti on the surface still leaves its indelible message. Only removal of the surface layer by sandblasting or the like can completely remove deeply penetrated graffiti.

Coatings have a role to play in combating graffiti by providing smooth sealed surfaces which prevent penetration. As the coating then becomes the layer which receives the graffiti, it in itself must be able to resist the cleaning agents and strong solvents used to remove the offending messages. This necessitates the use of very hard, densely cross-linked coatings such as specially formulated two-pot epoxies or polyurethanes with solvent resistance as their chief parameter.

Solvents used to clean off graffiti need to be strong enough to remove the graffiti without affecting the underlying coating. They also require an evaporation rate that is not too fast otherwise the graffiti becomes smeared over the surface and re-dries as the solvent evaporates. The ideal cleaning solvent will remain wet long enough for the surface to be wiped clean.

Resene offerings in this area are extensive - contact us for advice.

Resene Paints Ltd

Resene Paints Ltd   – www.resene.com

We would love to hear from you if you wish to use Resene's images, information and ideas for social medial, blogs, newsletters and other media use. Please email update@resene.co.nz and let us know what you need, what it is for and how Resene will be acknowledged as the source of the content. We are happy to assist with most requests.

Our vision is to be respected as a trusted, ethical and sustainable company and acknowledged as the leading provider of innovative paint and colour technology. View Resene’s profile and Environmental Policy.

Any personal data, such as name, address, phone, email details, supplied to Resene for the purposes of receiving newsletters, orders etc will be retained by Resene Paints Ltd and used only by Resene Paints Ltd and its trusted agencies for the purposes of communication/promotion/providing service to you. We do not sell, trade or otherwise transfer your personal data to outside third parties.. If you wish to opt out of communication from Resene please complete our contact us form. View our full Privacy Policy.

Colours shown on this website are a representation only. Please refer to the actual paint or product sample. Resene colour charts, testpots and samples are available for ordering online.   See measurements/conversions for more details on how electronic colour values are achieved.

View Videos